Dog and other woods…

The last trip to our cabin in Fish Camp near Yosemite National Park had a few hours for leisurely walks and Yatzhee! on the wraparound deck but was mostly about accomplishing chores necessary for the coming winter. We take the removable snow rails down from the deck and pull out the painted plywood snow doors for installation on two of our three entry doors. With central heat and a nice wood stove, we make use the cabin every few weeks throughout the cold season. It’s impossible to know whether we will have 10 feet of snow or none at all and so the smart money is to be prepared for whatever comes well in advance the the first icy flakes.

In my 2018 post Dogwood day…Memorial Day I featured bloom photos from the lone Cornus nuttalii, Pacific dogwood, on our property. I’ve since found that we have one other but certainly that’s not really the making of a dogwood forest, especially when the spring blooms bursting out along the highway to our place have almost a wedding like feel. On this visit the dogwood’s leaves are starting to show their fall color.

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Shaded by a high canopy of cedars, firs and pines it is a little hard to see the russet and purple tones creeping in.

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I got pretty excited when I saw a number of seed clusters well within my reach–maybe I can grow my own little dogwood forest! I texted my native plant mentor Ann for counsel and spent a bit of time on a few California native plant propagations sites to get a sense of the best way to go. The consensus was that directly sowing the seeds would probably be more successful than trying to start in pots. I was amazed to learn that germination could take up to 18 months!! Seed collection is #1 on my to-do list for our next trip–hopefully I won’t have missed my window of opportunity.

Number one of this trip’s list was to take care of our wood supply for the winter. We are able to cut firewood every year in specific amounts and from designated locations on public lands with US Forest Service permits. Every couple of years we supplement that supply with a load of cured and cut almond.

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In preparation for the new wood we shift the older wood remaining on the second set of wood cribs to the front one, making a nice open space for the new wood to be delivered. Even with two sets of hands this is a several hour job.

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The big truck makes the big dump

The weight of the wood truck (this one hauling 4 cords of wood stacked in the bed with vertical partitions separating each cord) dictates that the wood must be dumped at the TOP of our year old asphalt driveway–the truck could come down but would never be able to get back up!

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Our wood moving method involves Dave backing up our truck to the pile. We then fill up the bed, drive the truck down the hill and back it up near the wood cribs and unload it into another pile…three times.  A strong motivating factor is that we cannot drive off our property until the wood is moved.

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Then that big pile gets stacked onto the empty crib. The whole process takes about six or seven hours. Dave is strong and I am slow but steady. I am not sure I would have survived “the olden days”. He always gets the honor of placing the last log. With every stick tucked in its spot both piles get tarps and bungee cords to keep the wood dry. We use these two wood storage stacks to refresh the smaller wood supplies kept closer to the cabin. I am here to tell you this work makes even the most strenuous garden tasks seem lightweight!

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Missing these beautiful blooms until next spring (taken May 2018)

 

 

In a daze near Denver…a visit to Botanical Interests

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Have you ever wondered how the seeds we take so for granted every year for our annual cutting and veggie gardens get in those cute little packs illustrated with the beautiful color drawings? The Denver 2019 Garden Bloggers Fling organizing committee was lucky enough to have Judy Seaborn, co-owner of Botanical Interests, at its helm and some of her staff in its ranks. Her prominence in the Denver gardening community opened a lot of great garden gates for us–and she gave us the opportunity to see the operation of her company’s 300,000 square foot production warehouse in Broomfield.

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Judy Seaborn and partner Curtis Jones founded the 24 year old business in their garage, with a goal of providing gardeners more information on their seed packets. They now offer over 600 seed varieties which are sold in independent garden centers and through their mail order business. On their site http://www.botanicalinterests.com you will not only find the seeds of your dreams and selected garden products but also their blog and a variety of short educational articles. “I like to say that we are a gardening education company that just happens to sell seeds,” Curtis says in the About Us page on their site. You can also subscribe to their newsletter–there can never be too much gardening news in my inbox!

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A seed’s journey begins in the receiving area where huge bags full arrive from selected growers. Judy explains that every bag is “sampled” for germination rate. This involves inserting a sort of coring tube through the bag (specially designed to allow this) and sending the sample to her laboratory for germination testing. No bag of seed moves into the production process until Judy is satisfied that the germination rate meets her high standard.

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Boxes of printed envelopes for every variety await filling

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Judy almost glowed as she introduced us to her baby–this machine counts the seeds into the individual packets AND has a special mechanism inserting the tiniest seeds (like tomatoes) into a second internal sealed packet called a sachet.

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We’re learning the order filling process which uses this customized cart to increase efficiency of steps up and down the long rows of seed packets ready to be shipped.

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Each of hundreds of boxes contains a single type of seed and any given order may be for many different seed types. One of Judy’s 50 or so in-house staff will work each order on the “pick line” and once complete, the order will move to the packaging area.

The upstairs of the warehouse is home to the support staff which includes marketing and IT professionals. The seed packet art is all created by Colorado artists–here you see a proof sheet to be scrutinized for color and other detail.

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Botanical Interests also has 60 field based sales representatives across the nation–sounds like a great job for me! The  upstairs hallways are lined with photos sent in by customers of plants grown from Judy & Curtis’s seeds. Recently Judy introduced an indoor seed starting set up to look at new varieties.

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We can’t get away without a quick look–and sniff–at the “vault” where the most dear of the seeds are stored. Judy shared a story of a package delivery she was called out to sign for once, even though it was quite small the pounds of tiny seeds it held were valued at over $10,000. The vault also offers cold storage for seeds with relatively short germination lives.

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The vault has an amazingly earthy smell!

On the run again–last call for the bus to our next stop!

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Of course a seed company would have a garden–creative use of construction barriers and a retaining wall to make a nice deep planting space for a long rows of veggies planted from Botanical Interests seeds