Gamble Garden Spring Tour 2019…the last two gardens

EAST MEETS WEST

The owner of this historic Professorville cottage in Palo Alto wanted a garden to honor his father’s garden in the family’s native Vietnam. The result is an eclectic mix of tropical and traditional plants nestled amongst paths, gates and art pieces fashioned from driftwood and salvaged antique bricks.

Gamble drift 1

The fully enclosed front garden is a potpourri of shrubs and vines nestled underneath a canopy of mature oaks.

Gamble drift 4

The first of many unique driftwood creations crafted by the homeowner greets visitors near the front gate.

Gamble drift 2

Gamble drift 5

Mature rhododendrons grace the front walk–the only ones I saw on the tour this year.

Gamble drift 3

The piece of driftwood perched atop this gate’s frame is reminiscent of a bird stopped for a rest on its daily travels.

Gamble drift 7

Multi-colored antique bricks laid were laid in sand to make this rustic path.

Gamble drift 7

A vine covered arbor..

Gamble drift 8

…and another driftwood gate open onto a brick path to the back garden.

Gamble drift 9

The back garden features a brick floor with accents of stone and driftwood. The single sunny spot in the garden is home to a raised planter with its own ‘found wood’ fence.

Gamble drift 10

A raised gazebo is dressed in driftwood style and its comfy couch offers a great view of the garden.

Gazebo details

Gamble drift 15

A huge orchid in bloom,  Dendrobium  kingianum, is perched atop a waist high stump.

Gamble drift 14

Gamble drift 13

A rock waterfall, once part of a koi pond whose inhabitants sheltered under the raised platform of the gazebo, is home now to tropicals and ferns. The pond itself is now a brick floor, a bit of which you can see in the lower right corner.

Gamble drift 16

A neat stack of materials stands at the ready for future projects! The beauty of this garden for me was the homeowner’s obvious affinity for the space and enjoyment in creating his garden with his own hands.

A FEAST FOR THE SENSES

As much as I admire landscapes with sophisticated green and white palettes, perfectly poised pots, and every detail dedicated to the theme; I am at heart a gardening girl who loves a riot of color and texture, prefers her shrubs in naturalistic shapes and adds things to the garden just because I want to try them out rather than that they fit some prescribed color or category. This last garden of my day on the tour spoke to me in terms I not only understand but see as achievable and possible to maintain in my slightly messy, do what you will vibe.

Gamble senses 1

My dream home and garden would be an authentic Spanish bungalow tucked behind wonderful courtyard walls–a little bit of public garden street side and the rest of it  nestled privately inside where I could play to my heart’s content in raised beds reached by stone and ground cover paths. Although the garden of this third generation landscape professional is very visible from the street side, it checked almost all my design boxes.

Gamble senses 3

Red brick walks are the front garden’s floor and series of geometric beds harbor most pf the plants. The raised beds are capped with red brick and are perfect sitting walls. I love a good sitting wall!

Gamble senses 4

The beds have a definite East coast influence is throughout and are densely planted with a mixture of roses perennials coming in and out of bloom amongst a formal structure of evergreen shrubs.

Gamble senses 2

This neighborhood has sidewalks and wide parking strips (called something different everywhere-the area between the sidewalk and the curb)–masses of agapanthus and daylilies and other strap leafed perennials will make this the prettiest ‘hell strip’ in town when they are in full bloom.

Gamble senses 5

A mature tree canopy provides dappled shade to the front walk.

Gamble senses 7

The homeowner enjoys flower arranging and makes use of many blooms from her own garden. The front plantings were originally designed to serve as a demonstration garden for her clients.

Gamble senses 8

A narrow planting strip along the driveway offers vertical gardening opportunities, both softening the look of the property line fence and providing additional privacy.

Gamble senses 19

The driveway as seen from the garage which is placed far back on the lot. The combination of brickwork adds interest and just feels softer and cooler than concrete.

Gamble senses 9

A small guest house with a pergola whose columns mimic those on the home’s front facade separates the back garden into rooms. I thought this little sitting area was one of the most charming I saw on the tour and I know I would be relaxing out there every day.

Gamble senses 12

The red brick fountain tucked next to the sitting area is presided over by a Korean acolyte sculpture the homeowner has named Yoda. The glass balls are meant to deter raccoons from fishing in the pond!

Gamble senses 13

Green Goddess calla lilies share the spotlight with papyrus and other water plants in the pond.

Gamble senses 11

Raised beds and pots in the sitting area are massed with nasturtiums and other edible flowers.

Gamble senses 18

The sitting area and pergola provide a lovely view of the rectangular lawn with its wide compacted gravel walkway–the original brick walkway was replaced after the homeowner’s Parkinson’s disease diagnosis in preparation for a time when a wheelchair path might be needed. Railings were also added to any areas having even a step or two.

Gamble senses 10

The lawn leads to a raised patio from which to dine and enjoy the garden. Kiwi vines cover the the arbor and abundant roses are within reach of the house for easy cutting.

Gamble senses 14

A brick walkway between the guest house and the garage draws visitors back–anxious to see what other delights they will find.

Gamble senses 15

The lot is remarkably deep and easy to walk compacted gravel paths wind around beds filled with annuals, bulbs, perennials and herbs. A green screen along the back property line offers the sense of being all alone in the city.

Gamble senses 17

Ornamentals give way to edibles in raised beds. I could sooo…live in this garden. It feels cool and colorful without being fussy or overly regimented. This is a gardener’s garden.

Gamble senses 20

So ends this year’s Gamble Garden Spring Tour. The Elizabeth F. Gamble Garden deserves a post of its own and I’ll save that for the dog days of the summer when my spring travel is over and my own garden looks like scorched earth.

One thought on “Gamble Garden Spring Tour 2019…the last two gardens

  1. I really should have known that first garden, but I am not familiar with it. Many of the kids I grew up with wanted their homes in the Santa Clara Valley landscaped with plants that they remembered from Vietnam. It was not so easy back in the early 1990s. More of those plants are available now.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s